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What Do People Most Often Use CBD Oil For?

__________________________________________________________________________________    What Do People Most Often Use CBD Oil For? 

December 21, 2021

Author: Evolution of Healing

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December 21, 2021 7:00 AM PST-07:00 by Evolution of Healing a holistic wellness brand

 
 
 

What Do People Most Often Use CBD Oil For?

In a survey published in the July 2018 issue of Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, almost 62 percent of CBD users reported using it to treat a medical condition, the top three being pain, anxiety, and depression. (9)

Although the FDA has not approved using CBD to treat any of those conditions, there are signs CBD could be beneficial.

  1. Pain So far, most of the evidence for CBD’s ability to reduce pain comes from animal-based research, including a study published in December 2017 in the journal Pain, which found that CBD applied on the skin of rats with osteoarthritis significantly reduced joint pain and inflammation. (10) Continued use of CBD also prevented further pain and nerve damage in those same joints.
  2. Anxiety While there haven’t been any large-scale clinical trials testing CBD oil as a treatment for generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety, panic disorder, or phobias, a small study published in January 2019 in The Permanente Journal showed promising results. (2)

During the two-month study, 72 adults in a psychiatric clinic were given CBD oil capsules once daily. Most received 25 milligrams (mg) of CBD with a few receiving doses as high as 175 mg. Within the first month, more than 79 percent of the patients reported feeling calmer, and they continued to feel calmer for the duration of the study. “We saw no evidence of a safety issue that would limit future studies,” the researchers added.

  1. Depression Animal studies, including a study on mice in which depression was surgically induced, suggest that CBD is a potential treatment for depression. In this particular study, published in April 2016 in the journal Neuropharmacology, CBD worked “fast” on receptors in the brain to boost levels of serotonin, a chemical messenger thought to play an important role in regulating mood. (11) More recently, a study published in February 2019 in the journal Molecular Neurobiology showed that CBD induces “sustained antidepressant-like effects in mice.” (12)

“The animal data are very promising for a number of conditions, but rigorous randomized clinical trials have yet to be done,” says Kevin Hill, MD, director of the division of addiction psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “That is one of the frustrating aspects of the current state of cannabis: There are many companies and states profiting from the sale of cannabis and cannabinoids, but those same companies and states are not putting financial resources toward advancing the science.”

For Shannon Donnelly, her own experience with CBD is evidence enough. Since beginning a daily CBD regimen several years ago, she says her panic attacks are gone, as are other health problems, including depression. She currently takes 35 mg of CBD each morning and soaks in a tub of warm water laced with CBD bath salts each night.

“CBD gives me confidence,” Donnelly explains. “It gives me clarity and calm. I am now able to go into situations in which previously I would have used coping mechanisms that were very detrimental to myself, such as catastrophizing, negative self-talk, and overwhelming sadness.”

Donnelly’s experience so convinced her of CBD’s worth that she founded a company, Healthy Honeys, to spread the word — and to combat a particular problem that has plagued the CBD industry: inaccurately labeled products.

 

https://www.everydayhealth.com/marijuana/cbd-oil/